grubsludge:

funk-dabble:

littleleahlamb2k14:

grubsludge:

bury me in armor so I’ll be ready for the skeleton war

image

ready

why is his fricking chest uncovered? that’s ppor planning right there

what are you gonna do?

stab a skeleton in the heart?

(via strangely-arousing)

snazziest:

this was no accident

snazziest:

this was no accident

(Source: bearpapi, via artistryofmoi)

escapekit:

Papers for Characters

Spanish design studio Atipo has created a collection of minimalistic movie posters that are made from paper. 

Awesome. 

(Source: designtaxi.com, via plasticwrappedkisses)

(Source: thief-rikku, via artistryofmoi)

passion:

started from the bottom and i was somehow able to get lower

(via redvira)

drughouses:

mjolnir-worthy:

thefrozenrose:

veggielezzyfemmie:

It’s even cooler when you stand back and squint your eyes.

Or take your glasses off

Wow. That’s really impressive.


what if u don’t got glasses and i asain

drughouses:

mjolnir-worthy:

thefrozenrose:

veggielezzyfemmie:

It’s even cooler when you stand back and squint your eyes.

Or take your glasses off

Wow. That’s really impressive.

what if u don’t got glasses and i asain

(via haykatt)

cosmiccounty:

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

my love for this film is and always will be undying <3

cosmiccounty:

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

my love for this film is and always will be undying <3

(via redvira)

tastefullyoffensive:

[mrlovenstein]
oldbookillustrations:

In moonbeam half, and half in gloom,
Stood a tall form with nodding plume

A. Fredericks, from Marmion, by Walter Scott, illustrated under the direction of A. V. S. Anthony, Boston, 1885.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

In moonbeam half, and half in gloom,
Stood a tall form with nodding plume

A. Fredericks, from Marmion, by Walter Scott, illustrated under the direction of A. V. S. Anthony, Boston, 1885.

(Source: archive.org)

did-you-kno:

Source